AFR 271/ CAMS 271
Understanding American Slavery Through Film

This course will examine the history of cinema through the lens of American slavery. Outside of the classroom much of what we know, or think about slavery derives often from popular media-particularly through film and television. Can Hollywood do the work of historians? Does historical interpretation through film serve as useful, beneficial, or detrimental? Can we make an argument for the historical efficacy of films? What is the difference between historical accuracy and historical authenticity? In examining these films, we will take into account the time period, location, and the political and social context in which they were created. We will see how much film tells us about slavery and, most importantly, what film might tell us about ourselves. Through a critical reading of a range of historical works, cultural critiques and primary sources, students will have a better comprehension of how historians and filmmakers both differ or find mutual agreement in their understanding of the past.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 271

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Jackson

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 232/ CAMS 232
Anthropology of Media

This course introduces students to key analytic frameworks through which media and the mediation of culture have been examined. Using an anthropological approach, students will explore how media as representation and as cultural practice have been fundamental to the (trans)formation of modern sensibilities and social relations. We will examine various technologies of mediation-from the Maussian body as “Man's first technical instrument” to print capitalism, radio and cassette cultures, cinematic and televisual publics, war journalism, the digital revolution, and the political milieu of spin and public relations. Themes in this course include: media in the transformation of the senses; media in the production of cultural subjectivities and publics; and the social worlds and cultural logics of media institutions and sites of production.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 232

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Karakasidou

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ANTH 305/ CAMS 305
Ethnographic Film

This seminar explores ethnographic film as a genre for representing "reality," anthropological knowledge and cultural lives. We will examine how ethnographic film emerged in a particular intellectual and political economic context as well as how subsequent conceptual and formal innovations have shaped the genre. We will also consider social responses to ethnographic film in terms of the contexts for producing and circulating these works; the ethical and political concerns raised by cross-cultural representation; and the development of indigenous media and other practices in conversation with ethnographic film. Throughout the course, we will situate ethnographic film within the larger project for representing "culture," addressing the status of ethnographic film in relation to other documentary practices, including written ethnography, museum exhibitions, and documentary film.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 30 5

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or two 200-level units in anthropology, cinema and media studies, economics, history, political science, or sociology or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: TBD

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 226/ CAMS 207
History of Photography: From Invention to Media Age

Photography is so much a part of our private and public lives, and it plays such an influential role in our environment, that we often forget to examine its aesthetics, meanings, and histories. This course provides an introduction to these analyses by examining the history of photography from the 1830s to the present. Considering fine arts and mass media practices, the class will examine the works of individual practitioners as well as the emergence of technologies, aesthetic directions, markets, and meanings.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 20 7

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 strongly recommended.

Instructor: Berman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

ARTS 108/ CAMS 138
Photography I

Photo I is a foundational studio course exploring key methods and concepts in photography. Technical skills will be addressed through camera work, lighting, and traditional darkroom practices. Studio assignments, readings, discussions, lectures, gallery visits, and critiques will help students build the conceptual, aesthetic, and critical skills essential to understanding photography's broader role in contemporary art, history, and society. Aimed for first year and sophomore students, and those pursuing majors in Studio Art, MAS, or CAMS.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 8

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 138

Prerequisites: None. Open to Firstyears and Sophomores. Juniors and Seniors by permission of the instructor and should add themselves to the waitlist.

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Meets Production requirement for CAMS major.

ARTS 165/ CAMS 135
Introduction to the Moving Image

This introductory course explores video as an art form. Organized around a series of assignments designed to survey a range of production strategies, the course is a primer to the technical and conceptual aspects of video production and to its historical, critical, and technical discourse. Relationships between video and television, film, installation, and performance art are investigated emphasizing video as a critical intervention in social and visual arts contexts. Weekly readings, screenings, discussions and critique, explore contemporary issues in video and help students develop individual aesthetic and critical skills. Practical knowledge is integrated through lighting, video/sound production and editing workshops.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 7

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 135

Prerequisites: Open to First years and Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors by permission of instructor.

Instructor: Joskowicz

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Meets the Production requirement for CAMS majors. Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

ARTS 208/ CAMS 238
Photography II: The Digital/Analog Rift

Building on the foundation of Photo I, this intermediate course aims to strengthen students' conceptual photographic acumen while introducing advanced studio and location lighting, digital retouching, inkjet printing, and basic multimedia production. Assignments address contemporary and historic theories of photography as contemporary art and the aesthetic and cultural implications of the ubiquity of digital photography. Emphasis is on developing project-based photography through cultivating research, planning, conceptual, and production skills.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 238

Prerequisites: ARTS 108/CAMS 138, or ARTS 221, or permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: Van Beckum

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTS 221/ CAMS 239
Digital Imaging

Introduction to artistic production through electronic imaging, manipulation, and output. Emphasis on expression, continuity, and sequential structuring of visuals through the integration of image, text, and motion. Image output for print, screen, and adaptive surfaces are explored in conjunction with production techniques of image capture, lighting, and processing. Lectures and screenings of historic and contemporary uses of technology for artistic and social application of electronic imaging.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 239

Prerequisites: Any 100-level ARTS course.

Instructor: Olsen (Fall), TBA (Spring)

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ARTS 255/ CAMS 255
Dynamic Interface Design

Critical examination of the expanding field of information and interface design for interactive media. Emphasis will be on effective visual communication, information design, and creative content within online media. Hands-on production will focus on design methods, multimedia Web, vector-based media, and dynamic audio. Screenings and discussions on contemporary practices, theoretical, artistic, and cultural issues.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 255

Prerequisites: ARTS 108 /CAMS 138, ARTS 109 and CS 110 or CS 111.

Instructor: Olsen

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTS 260/ CAMS 230
Moving Image Studio

Creative exploration of the moving image as it relates to digital methods of animation, video, and motion graphics. Hands-on production of audio, image, text, and time-based media synthesis, with a conceptual emphasis on nonlinear narrative, communication design, and visual expression. Screenings and lectures on historical and contemporary practices, coupled with readings and discussions of the theoretical, artistic, and cultural issues in the moving image.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 230

Prerequisites: ARTS 108/CAMS 138, ARTS 165/CAMS 135, or ARTS 221/CAMS 239.

Instructor: Olsen

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

ARTS 265/ CAMS 235
Intermediate Video: Experimental Production

An intermediate level studio that guides students through different approaches to experimental video production while challenging linear narrative and documentary conventions. Students experiment with non-narrative approaches to content, structure, and technique. Investigations of space and performance are informed by poetry, literature, sound, color, fragmentation, and abstraction. Building upon the historical legacy of the moving image, students incorporate self-exploration, social critique, and manipulation of raw experience into an aesthetic form. This course explores the independent media and video fields as students develop independent video projects and articulate their artistic process through a series of presentations and critiques.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 235

Prerequisites: ARTS 165/CAMS 135 or permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: Joskowicz

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTS 308/ CAMS 338
Photography III

Advanced explorations of aesthetic and content issues through the use of both traditional light-sensitive and digital methodologies. Advanced photographic techniques and equipment will be presented in response to each student's work. Continued emphasis is placed on research into the content and context of the photographic image in contemporary practice through visiting artist events as well as gallery, museum, and studio visits.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 338

Prerequisites: ARTS 108/CAMS 138, and either ARTS 208/CAMS 238 or ARTS 221/CAMS 239, or permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Not offered in 2019-20.

ARTS 313/ CAMS 313
Virtual Form

Introduction to the design and production of three-dimensional objects and spaces using industry-standard modeling software. Overview of basic modeling, surface design, and camera techniques. Emphasis on creative application of the media, in relation to architectural, experimental, and time-based forms. Screenings and lectures on traditional and contemporary practices, coupled with readings and discussions of the theoretical, artistic, and cultural issues in the virtual world.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 313

Prerequisites: ARTS 113. Strong computer familiarity needed.

Instructor: Olsen

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

ARTS 321/ CAMS 321
Advanced New Media

Various topics in New Media are explored through research, creative activity, and theoretical discussion. Topics address historical as well as contemporary issues that bridge art and technology. This is an advanced level New Media course giving students the opportunity to focus in on their craft and concepts as well as receive critiques from other students with similar goals. Lectures on the historic and contemporary practices of intermedia artists, designers, thinkers and scientists, coupled with readings and discussions. Collaboration will be encouraged between, Studio Art, Music, CAMS, Media Arts, Theater and Computer Science.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 321

Prerequisites: Two 200-level courses in ARTS, CAMS, or MAS.

Instructor: Olsen

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: ARTS 321/CAMS 321 may be repeated, ordinarily for a maximum of two semesters.

ARTS 365/ CAMS 335
Advanced Video Production

This advanced-level class centers on the production and critique of individual film and video work, along with an ongoing schedule of screenings, readings, and discussions that investigate various positions from artists and directors on the dynamics of space on screen. Our focus will be on the construction of cinematic space as a formal and conceptual component of storytelling. Using poetry, film, and literature as guides to navigating both constructed and conceptual landscapes, student projects will oscillate between portraiture and social documentary. Formally, this class explores advanced strategies of image and sound manipulation, both technical and conceptual. It covers pre-production planning (storyboards and scripting), refinement of digital editing techniques, visual effects, post-production, as well as audio and sonic components. Students will develop semester-long video/film projects and will articulate their artistic process through a series of presentations and critiques over the semester.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 335

Prerequisites: ARTS 165/CAMS 135, ARTS 265/CAMS 235, and permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Joskowicz

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CAMS 101
Introduction to Cinema and Media Studies

CAMS 101 introduces students to the study of audio-visual media, including oral, print, photographic, cinematic, broadcast, and digital media forms and practices. Using a case study approach, we will explore the nature of audio-visual communication/representation in historical, cultural, disciplinary, and media-specific contexts, and examine different theoretical and critical perspectives on the role and power of media to influence our social values, political beliefs, identities, and behaviors. We'll also consider how consumers of media representations can and do contest and unsettle their embedded messages. Our emphasis will be on developing the research and analytical tools, modes of reading, and forms of critical practice that can help us to negotiate the increasingly mediated world in which we live.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None. Open to all students. CAMS 101 is required for all students majoring or minoring in Cinema and Media Studies, and should ideally be taken before any other CAMS course.

Instructor: Knouf

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

CAMS 105Y
First-Year Seminar: Twenty-first-Century Cinema

An introduction to the cinematic experience, this course explores the excitement of recent global filmmaking with a special focus on independent and foreign art films to which students are unlikely to have been exposed so far (e.g. slow cinema). Through selected films and readings, the seminar examines the basic elements of filmic language including mise-en-scène, editing, cinematography, the relation of sound to image, and narrative structure. The major novelty of this seminar is its emphasis on the production of audiovisual essays. Students will learn the basics of videography, engaging with the material in a hands-on fashion. The kind of cinemas examined and the videography component make this seminar a must for adventurous minds interested in the multifaceted potential of audiovisual language.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: None. Open to first-year students only.

Instructor: Viano

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

CAMS 106Y
First-Year Seminar: Ghostly Mediums: Specters and Hauntings in Media History and Technology

Specters haunt the nether-regions of media technology. Each new medium has offered potential avenues to hear the voices of the departed or contact otherworldly beings. In this course we will explore these possibilities through close attention to the ways in which media attempts to move beyond the earthly plane. These are extraordinary claims whose veracity is always under question but also tell us much about our own desires. We'll consider photography, phonography, magnetic tape, television, radio, and the internet, among other mediums. Students will also have the chance to test some of these claims through hands-on exercises and their own attempts to push the boundaries of media communication. No formal background in media history or production is required.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Knouf

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 201
Technologies of Cinema and Media

This course investigates the technological, economic, and cultural determinants behind forms of media from the last 150 years, including the telephone, the telegraph, photography, and film, as well as new media like virtual reality and interactive media. If photography realized the desire to transcend mortality and early cinema fulfilled the dream to depict the world, their missions have been extended by technologies that seek to invent new worlds as well as material and virtual realities. Relying on a material theory of film and audio-visual media, the course examines both technologies of making and of circulation, exploring the commercial potential of the entertainment industry. The course will employ relevant texts, films, and other audio-visual artifacts.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CAMS 101 or CAMS 105 or CAMS 106 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Morari, Knouf

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CAMS 202
Aesthetics of Cinema and Media

Examining cinematic forms and styles, this course retraces film's emergence and development as an art and its relations to other artistic, cultural, technological, and socio-economic practices. Analysis of representative films will help understand cinema's relationship to reality, including its reproduction and construction of the "real," the changing terms of spectatorship, and the ways in which film aesthetics have been employed to build ideology and interrogate it. Understanding form as inextricably bound to content, we will appreciate the aesthetic significance of formal choices and innovations within particular films, directorial oeuvres, periods and movements, from classical Hollywood cinema to European New Waves of the 60s and 70s, to the contemporary cinemas of Asia and Latin America.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CAMS-101 or CAMS-105 or CAMS-106 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Morari, Knouf

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CAMS 208/ ENG 208
Writing for Television

A workshop course on writing the television script, including original pilots and episodes of existing shows. We’ll study both one-hour dramas and half-hour comedies, and practice the basics of script format, visual description, episode structure, and character and story development. Students will complete a final portfolio of 30-50 minutes (pages) of teleplay.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 20 8

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Holmes

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

CAMS 213/ GER 288
From Berlin and London to Hollywood (in English)

This course offers an introduction to the formative years of Hollywood by tracing the impact of European cinema on the American movie industry. Focusing on the work of film directors who in the first half of the twentieth century left the European centers of film-making for Hollywood, we will discuss the commercial competition between Berlin, London, and Hollywood as well as notions of aesthetic transfer. Among the actors and directors to be discussed are Marlene Dietrich, Alfred Hitchcock, F.W. Murnau, Fritz Lang, Ernst Lubisch, Billy Wilder, Douglas Sirk, Charlie Chaplin and others.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 213

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Nolden

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

CAMS 216/ MAS 216
Creative Media Manipulation

The arts and humanities are infused with media, from the printed word to digital images, videos, and sound. Knowing how these media are constructed at a fundamental material level means that one can be an active producer of digital artifacts, rather than a passive consumer who cedes creative control to someone else. In this course students will learn programming skills that allow them to create and manipulate images, text, video, sound, and the physical world. Programming languages and environments may include Processing, Python, Arduino, and Lilypad. Lectures, assignments, and programming experiments will ensure that all students understand the material regardless of experience or background. We will regularly illustrate the intersection of the arts and humanities with computation and digital technologies through the reading of historical texts and the close examination of specific works. Skills learned in the course will be useful for future work in the digital humanities among other domains.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: MAS 216

Prerequisites: CAMS 101, MAS 115, or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Knouf

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 218
Theories of Media From Photography to the Internet

Considering media as diverse as photography, film, radio, television, video, sound recording, and the Internet, this course is an introduction to the major theoretical works of media theory through a close attention to both texts and media artifacts. Topics include theories of ideology, spectatorship and reception, structuralism and poststructuralism, modernism and postmodernism, semiotics, psychoanalysis, postcolonialism, feminism, and queer theory. Through class discussions and writing assignments, students will consider both prevailing conceptual currents as well as alternative formulations in order to question the various forces that work to shape media as material and discursive systems. Readings will be structured so that media works are paired with historical and contemporary texts in order to draw out the connections between the theory, history, and practice of media.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: CAMS 101

Instructor: Morari

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Required for all students majoring or minoring in Cinema and Media Studies.

CAMS 222
"Being There": Documentary Film and Media

This course surveys the history, theory, and practice of documentary film, considering the ways its forms and ethics have changed since the beginning of cinema. We study the major modes of the documentary, including cinema verité, direct cinema, investigative documentary, ethnographic film, agit-prop and activist media, and the personal essay, as well as recent forms such as the docudrama, the archival film, “mockumentary,” and Web-based forms. We will examine the “reality effects” of these works, focusing on the ways in which they create their authority. We will ask: How do these films shape notions of truth, reality, and point of view? What are the ethics and politics of representation and who speaks for whom when we watch a documentary? What do documentaries make visible or conceal?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: CAMS 101 or ARTH 101 or permission of the instructor. CAMS core course. Meets core requirement for CAMS major and minor.

Instructor: TBD

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CAMS 225
Cinema in the Public Sphere: From the Fairground to Netflix

How did cinema, originally hailed as a popular entertainment, achieve the social legitimacy that elevated it to the rank of an art form and an industrial force? This course examines the development of cinema as an institution over the last 150 years, from its origins to its present digital extensions, from Europe to Latin America, from Japan to the United States. Relying on academic scholarship, film criticism, and a selection of documentaries and essay-films, we will examine the historical, social and aesthetic conditions that led to the creation of the movie theater, the opening of cine-clubs, art houses, and multiplexes, as well as cinema's relationship to television and the exponentialized accessibility of films in the age of video and streaming.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CAMS 101, CAMS 105 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Morari

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 229
Transnational Journeys in European Women’s Filmmaking

The purpose of this course is to examine award winning films directed by European women, from activist documentaries to experimental and mainstream features. These artists set their narratives in a milieu of national contexts, diasporic identities, and post-national transformations. They also weave together private spheres and public events, revisit historical wounds, explore contemporary realities and assemble these elements as the tiles of a socio-cultural mosaic. Examined through feminist theory, the films selected for this course explore the poetics of presence and (in)visibility. This course also aims to develop a transnational comparative film analysis.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Laviosa

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

CAMS 234/ ENG 204
The Art of Screenwriting

A creative writing course in a workshop setting for those interested in the theory and practice of writing for film. This course focuses on the full-length feature film, both original screenplays and screen adaptations of literary work. Enrollment is limited to 15 students.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 234

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Cezair-Thompson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit. Students who have taken this course once may register for it one additional time.

CAMS 240/ WGST 223
Gendering the Bronze Screen: Representations of Chicanas/Latinas in Film

The history of Chicanxs and Latinxs on the big screen is a long and complicated one. To understand the changes that have occurred in the representation of Chicanxs/Latinxs, this course proposes an analysis of films that traces various stereotypes to examine how those images have been perpetuated, altered, and ultimately resisted. From the Anglicizing of names to the erasure of racial backgrounds, the ways in which Chicanxs and Latinxs are represented has been contingent on ideologies of race, gender, class, and sexuality. We will be examining how films have typecast Chicanas/Latinas as criminals or as "exotic" based on their status as women of color, and how Chicano/Latino filmmakers continue the practice of casting Chicanas/Latinas solely as supporting characters to male protagonists.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 240

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Mata

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CAMS 241/ WGST 249
Asian American Women in Film

This course will serve as an introduction to representations of Asian/American women in film beginning with silent classics and ending with contemporary social media. In the first half of the course, we examine the legacy of Orientalism, the politics of interracial romance, the phenomenon of "yellow face", and the different constructions of Asian American femininity, masculinity, and sexuality. In the second half of the course, we look at "Asian American cinema" where our focus will be on contemporary works, drawing upon critical materials from film theory, feminist studies, Asian American studies, history, and cultural studies.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 241

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Creef

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CAMS 243/ SAS 243
Love in Indian Cinema

This course explores the treatment of various types of love-for the beloved, the family, the community, the motherland or the divine-in Indian cinema, the largest and one of the oldest film industries in the world. Beginning with Indian cinema's early phase in the colonial milieu, the course continues with an examination of its flourishing in popular and art films in the later part of the twentieth century and films made by diaspora Indians. We will watch films by prominent directors like Bimal Roy, Guru Dutt, Raj Kapoor, Mani Ratnam, and Meera Nayar that have “love” as a core theme. With particular attention to the distinctive grammar of song, dance and intense drama, we will consider how Indian cinema offers a mirror to the society and culture of India, reworking its long conventions of narratives and performance in a medium imported from Europe.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 243

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Shukla-Bhatt

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 250
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and director of Cinema and Media Studies required.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CAMS 250H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and director of Cinema and Media Studies required.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CAMS 272
The Ludic Imagination: Histories and Theories of Games and Play

Videos games have become a major cultural force, with budgets for new titles rivaling those of feature films. Yet video games are oft maligned as time wasters or contributors to deviant behavior. This course takes a different stance, and shows that games are not simply frivolous activities, but rather are emblems of societal desires. Introducing the burgeoning field of "game studies", we will examine not only contemporary video games but also their connection to earlier forms of games and play. Topics will include the relationships between industry and indie games; forms of representation in video games; artistic uses of games for cultural critique; the connections between video games and other forms of screen-based media; and the ways in which new forms of play merge the physical and the digital worlds. Important to our investigation will be hands-on encounters with new and old games in order to highlight the connections between the theories we study and the embodied experience of play.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: CAMS 101, CAMS 135/ARTS 165, or ARTH 100 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 276
Media Publics: An Introduction to Civic Media

This course will examine how media (such as print, the telephone, radio, film, television, video, mobile phones, and the Internet, among others) intersect with civil society. We will explore how these media function in the development of publics and counterpublics, and how communities repurpose these media for their own ends. While we regularly hear how some new form of social media is going to "revolutionize'' public participation by fostering the development of new communities and toppling repressive regimes, we will take a more skeptical stance, examining how "new'' media have always been imbued with revolutionary potential, but also how they often fall prey to entrenched commercial interests. Nevertheless, we will examine cases where bottom-up development of new forms of participation and engagement with media have enabled otherwise marginalized voices to be expressed. Students will have the opportunity to create their own civic media projects for the public(s) of their choice.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: CAMS 101, or permission of instructor

Instructor: Knouf

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

CAMS 286/ GER 286
Fantasy Factories: Film and Propaganda in Nazi Germany and Beyond (in English)

This course examines the cinematic output of Nazi Germany as a test case for the development of film as propaganda. We consider the cinematic medium as entertainment and as a cultural event with the potential to influence a population. We trace the forebears of Nazi film, including WWI propaganda produced in Britain, France and Germany and Soviet films made to serve the revolutionary agenda. We examine the ways in which Goebbels' Ministry of Propaganda deployed both overtly propagandist films and films that couched Nazi ideals in narratives from melodrama to fantasy, and examine whether films could exceed their official aims and become subversive. And we consider post-WWII developments: the continuing careers of producers of propaganda and the ways that modern media shapes new forms of propaganda.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 286

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Hans

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 292/ ENG 292
Film Noir

A journey through the dark side of the American cinematic imagination. Emerging during World War II and its aftermath, Film Noir presents a pessimistic, morally ambiguous inversion of Hollywood uplift, delivered in glamorous visual style. This course will explore Film Noir from its origins, through the revival of the genre in the early 1970s, to its ongoing influence in contemporary cinema. We'll pay particular attention to noir's redefinition of American cinematic style, and to its representations of masculinity and femininity. Films that may be studied include Howard Hawks's The Big Sleep, Billy Wilder's Double Indemnity, Robert Altman's The Long Goodbye, Roman Polanski's Chinatown, and David Lynch's Mulholland Drive.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 292

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Shetley

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 300/ FREN 300
Post-Apocalyptic Cinema: French Visions of Ecological Trauma (in French)

How has French cinema responded to the reality of environmental crisis and the specter of ecological catastrophe? Issues linked to political ecologies and environmental ethics, anthropocentrism, climate change, pollution and technological challenges have influenced the shape and substance of these cinematic responses. Work in the film medium has assumed a critical place in a forum otherwise dominated by specialists in sciences, economics and engineering. Indeed, French cinema has articulated a French voice in response to this global problem. As we probe environmental discourses and their cinematic figuration, we will read, among others, texts by Marc Augé, Luce Irigaray or Bruno Latour, and discuss representative films by directors such as Georges Méliès, René Clair, Agnès Varda, Chris Marker, Jean-Luc Godard, Claire Denis or Jacques Tati. This course is taught in French.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 300

Prerequisites: FREN 210 or FREN 212; and one additional unit, FREN 213 or above.

Instructor: Morari

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: In French.

CAMS 320
Seminar: Sonic Modulations: Investigating Sound as a Medium

Sound is a physical force that modulates both air and our emotions simultaneously. Sound can align our bodies to the rhythm of music or knock us down via an acoustic weapon. Despite this power, the sonic has often been subsumed by the visual in humanistic discourse. Recent decades have nevertheless expanded the purview of media studies into the domain of “sound studies”. This course will explore the foundational ideas, texts, and materials in this nascent field. We will explore how sound shapes (and is shaped by) space and time, how it is culturally coded, how it works to distribute both information and feelings, and how listening is an active force. Students will also engage with material experiments in sound that weave sound studies theory, history, and practice together.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: CAMS 202 or CAMS 218 or instructor permission.

Instructor: Knouf

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 324
Film Genre, Genre Films

We constantly describe films with labels like action, horror, rom-com, sci-fi, musical, western, but where do those categories come from, and how do we decide what belongs within them? This course will explore the concept of film genre in terms both theoretical and practical. We’ll examine the antecedents of cinema’s genre system in literary criticism, read key works of film genre theory, and watch films in a wide range of genres. Among the questions we’ll address are: How do ideas about genre help us understand the cinematic experience? How do genre categories influence the production and marketing of films, and the discourse around them? How do ideas about genre connect to social identities, such as race and gender, to create categories like “chick flick” or “Blaxploitation”? What criteria differentiate the genres we value from those we don’t?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Either CAMS 201 or CAMS 202, and an additional 200-level CAMS course.

Instructor: Vernon Shetley

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CAMS 327
Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Public Writing on Film and TV

This course will explore a wide range of writing on current film and television, thinking about the forms of contemporary discourse on the moving image and ways our own writing can join the conversation. We will read and write reviews, trend pieces, and star studies, bringing our specialized knowledge as moving image enthusiasts to bear on pieces intended to speak to and engage a broad reading public. Students will develop and present their writing in workshop discussions, and serve as editors to their peers. Readings from classic and contemporary writers on film and television will help us refine our sense of what makes writing on media illuminating, accessible, and compelling.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: CAMS 202 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Shetley

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CAMS 350H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CAMS 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the director.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

CAMS 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: CAMS 360 and permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.