ECON 101
ECON 101 - Principles of Microeconomics

This first course in economics provides the fundamental tools for exploration of the field. Microeconomics considers the decisions of households and firms about what to consume and what to produce, and the efficiency and equity of market outcomes. Supply and demand analysis is developed and applied. Policy issues include price controls, competition and monopoly, income inequality , and the role of government in market economies.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the Quantitative Reasoning (QR) component of the Quantitative Reasoning & Data Literacy requirement.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ECON 101P
ECON 101P - Principles of Microeconomics

This first course in economics provides the fundamental tools for exploration of the field. Microeconomics considers the decisions of households and firms about what to consume and what to produce, and the efficiency and equity of market outcomes. Supply and demand analysis is developed and applied. Policy issues include price controls, competition and monopoly, income inequality, and the role of government in market economies.

Econ 101P is open to (but is not limited to) students who do not meet the QR prerequisites for ECON 101 and is also appropriate for students who, because of their previous preparation in economics and mathematics, would benefit from additional academic support for their study of introductory economics. Additional class meeting slots will emphasize fluency with mathematical tools needed for success in economics. Students are normally expected to enroll concurrently in ECON 251H.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor. First generation students and students with QR scores below 10 will be sent an explicit invitation to join. Concurrent enrollment in ECON 251H is expected but is not a requirement.

Instructor: Rothschild

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ECON 102
ECON 102 - Principles of Macroeconomics

This course follows ECON 101 in continuing to build fundamental tools for exploration of the field. The course analyzes the aggregate dimensions of a market-based economy. Topics include the measurement of national income, economic growth, unemployment, inflation, business cycles, the balance of payments, and exchange rates. The impact of government monetary and fiscal policies is considered.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: ECON 101. Fulfillment of the Quantitative Reasoning (QR) component of the Quantitative Reasoning & Data Literacy requirement.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ECON 102P
ECON 102P - Principles of Macroeconomics

This course follows ECON 101 in continuing to build fundamental tools for exploration of the field. The course analyzes the aggregate dimensions of a market-based economy. Topics include the measurement of national income, economic growth, unemployment, inflation, business cycles, the balance of payments, and exchange rates. The impact of government monetary and fiscal policies is considered. ECON 102P is open to (but is not limited to) students who do not meet the QR prerequisites for ECON 101 and is also appropriate for students who, because of their previous preparation in economics and mathematics, would benefit from additional academic support for their study of introductory economics. Additional class meeting slots will emphasize fluency with mathematical tools needed for success in economics. Students are normally expected to enroll concurrently in ECON 251H.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 101P, taken at Wellesley. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor. First generation students and students with QR scores below 10 will be sent an explicit invitation to join. Concurrent enrollment in ECON 251H is expected but is not a requirement. Students who took ECON 101P will be given priority in admission to ECON 102P.

Instructor: Weerapana

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 103
ECON 103/ SOC 190 - Intro Prob & Stat Methods

An introduction to the collection, analysis, interpretation, and presentation of quantitative data as used to understand problems in economics and sociology. Using examples drawn from these fields, this course focuses on basic concepts in probability and statistics, such as measures of central tendency and dispersion, hypothesis testing, and parameter estimation. Data analysis exercises are drawn from both academic and everyday applications.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: SOC 190

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or one course in sociology. Fulfillment of the Quantitative Reasoning (QR) component of the Quantitative Reasoning & Data Literacy requirement. Not open to students who have taken or are taking STAT 160, STAT 218, PSYC 105 or PSYC 205.

Instructor: Levine, McKnight, Swingle (Sociology)

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Degree Requirements: DL - Data Literacy (Formerly QRF); DL - Data Literacy (Formerly QRDL)

Typical Periods Offered: Summer; Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes:

ECON 201
ECON 201 - Intermediate Micro Analysis

Intermediate microeconomic theory: analysis of the individual household, firm, industry, and market, and the social implications of resource allocation choices. Emphasis on application of theoretical methodology.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: All of the following -- ECON 101, ECON 102, and one math course at the level of MATH 115 or higher. The math course must be taken at Wellesley.

Instructor: Park, Skeath, McKnight

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ECON 202
ECON 202 - Intermediate Macro Analysis

Intermediate macroeconomic theory: analysis of fluctuations in aggregate income and growth and the balance of payments. Analysis of policies to control inflation and unemployment.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: All of the following -- ECON 101, ECON 102, and one math course at the level of MATH 115 or higher. The math course must be taken at Wellesley.

Instructor: Hilt, Neumuller, Shurchkov, Sichel

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ECON 203
ECON 203 - Econometrics

This course introduces students to the methods economists use to assess empirical relationships, primarily regression analysis. Issues examined include statistical significance, goodness-of-fit, dummy variables, and model assumptions. Includes an introduction to panel data models, instrumental variables, and randomized and natural experiments. Students learn to apply the concepts to data, read economic research, and write an empirical research paper.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: All of the following -- ECON 101, ECON 102, and one math course at the level of MATH 115 or higher. The math course must be taken at Wellesley. One course in statistics (ECON 103, PSYC 105, PSYC 205, STAT 160, or STAT 218) is also required.

Instructor: Giles, Shastry

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Degree Requirements: DL - Data Literacy (Formerly QRF); DL - Data Literacy (Formerly QRDL)

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: The Credit/Non Credit grading option is not available for this course. Letter graded only.

ECON 204
ECON 204 - Big Ideas in Economics

Economics is the only social science in which the Nobel prize is awarded, and the list of winners and citations showcases the evolution of the discipline and economic ideas with staying power. This course will use the Nobel Prize as a starting point for students to apply what they have learned in principles of economics courses by exploring how economists have framed, and answered, important empirical and theoretical questions in our field. Topics may include incentives and decision-making; poverty, inequality, and welfare concerns; market design, firm behavior, and competition; externalities; financial markets; economic growth and macroeconomic equilibrium; the application of empirical methods to social problems; and possible future prize-winning ideas.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102.

Instructor:  Deyette Werkema

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 213
ECON 213 - Int'l Finance & Macro Policy

This course introduces the study of macroeconomics in an open economy. Topics include basic features of foreign exchange markets, the structure of the balance of payments accounts, and the effectiveness of macroeconomic policy under fixed and flexible exchange rates and varying degrees of capital mobility. The course also examines the evolution of the international financial system, the role of the IMF, the creation of the European Monetary Union, and the recent financial crises in East Asia, Russia, and Brazil.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102.

Instructor: Weerapana

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 214
ECON 214 - Trade Policy

More than half of all the goods and services produced in the world are traded across national boundaries. While economists agree that international trade is beneficial overall, allowing consumers to get more kinds of goods at lower prices, politicians and citizens often see trade as harmful to their interests. This course will examine the economic argument in favor of trade, explore the reasons why nations choose restrictive trade policies and even engage in trade wars, and analyze the consequences of those policies for economic well being. We will also consider the climate consequences of the movement of goods around the world. The course will make significant use of a case discussion format requiring class participation.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 101. ECON 103 is recommended.

Instructor: Velenchik

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 220
ECON 220 - Development Economics

Survey and analysis of problems and circumstances of less-developed nations. Examination of theories of economic growth for poor nations. Review of policy options and prospects for low- and middle-income economies. Specific topics include: population growth, poverty and income distribution, foreign aid, and human resource strategies.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102. ECON 103 recommended.

Instructor: Abeberese, Werkema

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ECON 222
ECON 222/ PEAC 222 - Games of Strategy

Should you sell your house at an auction where the highest bidder gets the house, but only pays the second-highest bid? Should the U.S. government institute a policy of never negotiating with terrorists? The effects of decisions in such situations often depend on how others react to them. This course introduces some basic concepts and insights from the theory of games that can be used to understand any situation in which strategic decisions are made. The course will emphasize applications rather than formal theory. Extensive use is made of in-class experiments, examples, and cases drawn from business, economics, politics, movies, and current events.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 21

Crosslisted Courses: PEAC 222

Prerequisites: ECON 101.

Instructor: Skeath

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ECON 226
ECON 226/ EDUC 226 - Economics of Education Policy

Uses a microeconomic framework to analyze important questions in education policy about school finance, organization, efficiency, and equity. Is education a private good? What are the costs and benefits of expanded education for individuals, communities, and countries? What are the consequences of more widespread early childhood education and college attendance? What is the role of teachers, peers, and families in education? Does school choice promote student achievement? Applies concepts such as comparative statics, subsidies, externalities, perfect and imperfect competition, cost-benefit analysis, and welfare analysis to these and other questions. Each semester includes one or two policy discussions on contemporary issues in education.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: EDUC 226

Prerequisites: ECON 101. ECON 102 and ECON 103 recommended.

Instructor: Werkema

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ECON 228
ECON 228/ ES 228 - Environmental & Resource Econ

This course considers the economic aspects of resource and environmental issues. After examining the concepts of externalities, public goods, and common property resources, we will discuss how to measure the cost and benefits of environmental policy in order to estimate the socially optimal level of the environmental good. Applications of these tools will be made to air and water pollution, renewable and nonrenewable resources, and global climate. In addressing each of these problems we will compare various public policy responses such as regulation, marketable permits, and tax incentives.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: ES 228

Prerequisites: ECON 101

Instructor: Keskin

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 229
ECON 229 - Women in the Economy

This course uses economic theory and empirical analysis to examine the lives of women and their role in the economy. We first discuss the economics of gender and note that the research on the economics of gender tends to fall into three areas: analyses of labor markets, analyses of policies and practices to address issues facing working women and their families, and analyses of the economic status of women across countries. After that introduction, we will discuss women's educational attainment and participation in the labor market, gender segregation and the gender pay gap, discrimination, division of labor within household, and work versus family-life balance. In the second segment we will review government and company policies, like affirmative action, aimed at issues faced by working women and families. The final section will examine international evidence on the economic status of women and their changing role in the world economy.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 103, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Kerr

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 232
ECON 232 - Health Economics

This course explores the health care sector and health policy issues from an economic perspective.  Topics to be discussed include the demand for health insurance, the supply of health care, health care costs, health outcomes and disparities, and the recent U.S. health care reform law.  The course focuses primarily on the U.S., with some discussion of these issues in an international context. 

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 101

Instructor: Coile

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 233
ECON 233 - Microeconomics of Pandemics

Pandemics like the COVID-19 crisis can exact a heavy toll in the loss of human life. Yet their consequences may also include job losses and business failures, volatility in stock and product markets, and (potentially permanent) changes to global supply chains, work, education, and cities. In this course, we examine pandemics through a microeconomic lens. Topics to be explored include the health costs of pandemics, the economics of vaccines, insuring individuals against pandemic-related risks, racial and socioeconomic disparities in pandemic impacts, the effects of pandemics on firms and markets, and government interventions to combat pandemics. In exploring these topics, we will use standard microeconomic tools including the supply and demand model, models of consumer and firm behavior, cost-benefit analysis, and the expected utility model. We will read current research on COVID-19 as well as research on earlier events like the 1918 influenza pandemic.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 101. ECON 103 (or equivalent) recommended. Not open to students who have taken ECON 232 or ECON 332.

Instructor: Coile

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 241
ECON 241/ LAST 241 - Poverty & Inequality Latin Am.

The course provides a survey of economic development in Latin America, emphasizing issues related to the reduction of poverty and inequality. The first part of the course explores the economic history of the region, including twentieth-century policies designed to promote growth and industrialization; the 1980s debt crisis; and subsequent episodes of economic reform and crisis. The second part of the course acquaints students with evaluations of education, health, and welfare policies that are designed to alleviate poverty and inequality in Latin America.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: LAST 241

Prerequisites: ECON 101. ECON 103 (or equivalent) recommended.

Instructor: McEwan

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

ECON 250
ECON 250 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes:

ECON 250H
ECON 250H - Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non Credit

ECON 251H
ECON 251H - Initiative: Scholars of Econ

This course is designed to deepen students' engagement with scholarship in Economics. Enrollment is by invitation only and will draw from students concurrently enrolled in the core required courses for the major or minor. The class will introduce students to current research in Economics, presented by different faculty members, and link that research to skills and concepts covered in core required courses. Students will gain a better understanding of the ways the tools they are learning in their courses can be applied to real world issues.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None. Enrollment is by invitation only.

Instructor: Rothschild, Weerapana

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non Credit. The class meets once per week for 75 minutes. It earns 0.5 units and may be repeated once for additional credit.

ECON 301
ECON 301 - Adv. Microeconomic Analysis

Further development and application of the tools of analysis developed in ECON 201 (Intermediate Micro). Students will study advanced topics in consumer and producer theory, including strategic models of firm behavior in the presence of market power and many-good models of household behavior. Emphasis on mathematical manipulation of models and effective communication of advanced theoretical reasoning and results.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201. MATH 205 recommended.

Instructor: Skeath

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 302
ECON 302 - Advanced Macroeconomics

In this course, students will learn about, and apply, mathematical techniques and econometric tools from doing macroeconomic analysis. In terms of mathematical preparation, students are expected to have a good knowledge of calculus and will be introduced to relevant topics in linear algebra, differential equations, and dynamic optimization. In terms of econometrics, students will learn about time-series econometrics and vector auto-regressions. Economic applications will include economic growth, search models of unemployment, New Keynesian models for macroeconomic policy evaluation, and dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: All of the following - ECON 201, ECON 202, ECON 203, MATH 205.

Instructor: Neumuller

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 303
ECON 303 - Advanced Econometrics

This course will develop students' understanding of causal inference in cutting-edge empirical research. Students will develop tools for their own work and enhance their ability to critically evaluate research in the social sciences. How should a researcher approach an empirical question? How should a policymaker evaluate the impact of a program? Topics include randomized experiments, instrumental variables, panel data, regression discontinuity designs and machine learning. Applications will emphasize research on the frontier of applied microeconomics.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 203, and MATH 205.

Instructor: Park

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ECON 306
ECON 306 - Hist Econ Organizations in US

This course will use the insights of organization theory to analyze the development of the U.S. economy. The main topics to be examined will include: the evolution of the U.S. banking and financial system and the institutional changes underlying each phase of its development; the contractual foundations of business organizations and the choice between partnerships and the corporate form; the rise of big business and the great merger wave of the 1890s and the legal changes that made these developments possible; and the regulatory innovations of the Securities and Exchange Commission in the 1930s. The course will employ a variety of sophisticated theoretical and empirical methods in analyzing these developments and will present them in comparative international perspective.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202 and ECON 203.

Instructor: Hilt

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ECON 310
ECON 310 - Public Economics

This course explores the reasons for government intervention in the economy and the responses of households and firms to the government's actions. Economic models and empirical research are used to analyze tax policies and spending programs. Topics include the effect of taxes on savings and labor supply, externalities and public goods, and social insurance programs such as social security and unemployment insurance.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203.

Instructor: Giles

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 311
ECON 311 - Economics of Immigration

This course examines the economic causes and consequences of international migration, both historically and in the present, with a focus on the U.S. experience. We explore changes in immigration law over time and the political debates surrounding immigration in the past and present. Topics include: the effect of immigrants on the wages of the native born; immigrants' use of welfare and other social services; and immigrants' involvement in crime and their treatment in the criminal justice system. In each case, students will discuss the popular perception, the theory, and the empirical evidence, with a focus on the public policy alternatives for dealing with each issue.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203.

Instructor: Butcher

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 312
ECON 312 - The Economics of Globalization

This course examines the reasons for the integration across borders of the markets in goods and the factors of production, and the consequences of these trends. In the first part of the course we discuss the meanings, measurement, and history of globalization. We then investigate the rationale and record of international trade, the immigration of labor, and global financial flows. We examine issues related to international public goods, and the need for collective solutions to such global problems as pandemics and pollution. We also investigate the records of international governmental organizations.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201

Instructor: Joyce

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 313
ECON 313 - International Macroeconomics

This course deals with economic activity in an open economy. Students learn basic concepts, including the balance of payments, exchange rates, and capital flows. The impact of government policies in open economies is analyzed. The last section examines financial crises and the role of the IMF.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202 and ECON 203.

Instructor: Joyce

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 314
ECON 314 - International Trade Theory

This course analyzes the causes and consequences of international trade. The theory of international trade and the effects of trade policy tools are developed in both perfect and imperfect competition, with reference to the empirical evidence. This framework serves as context for the consideration of several important issues: the effect of trade on income inequality, the relationship between trade and the environment, the importance the World Trade Organization, strategic trade policy, the role of trade in developing countries, and the effects of free trade agreements.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203

Instructor: Abeberese

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ECON 318
ECON 318 - Econ Analysis Social Policy

This course uses economic analysis to evaluate important social policy issues in the United States, focusing on the role of government in shaping social policy and its impact on individuals. Does welfare make people work less or have more children? Why is the teenage birthrate so high, and how might it be lowered? How do fertility patterns respond to changes in abortion policy? Theoretical models and econometric evidence will be used to investigate these and other issues.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203

Instructor: Levine

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 320
ECON 320 - Economic Development

This course examines what factors help to explain why some countries are rich and others poor and whether economic policies can affect these outcomes. We will study key aspects of life for poor households in the developing world, such as inequality, gender, and the intra-household division of resources; education; child labor; health; savings and credit; institutions; and globalization. Students will study recent research in the field and examine empirical evidence on these topics.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203.

Instructor: Shastry

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ECON 321
ECON 321 - Corporate Finance

This course analyzes the major financial decisions facing firms from the perspective of a manager making choices about what investments to undertake, how to finance these projects, and how best to manage their risks. This course is particularly focused on the underlying economic models that are relevant for making these choices. Topics include capital budgeting, links between real and financial investments, optimal capital structure, dividend policy, and firm valuation. Additional topics may include corporate risk management, corporate governance, corporate restructuring, such as mergers and acquisitions, and start-up/entrepreneurial financing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 103 (or equivalent course) and ECON 201

Instructor:  Neumuller

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 322
ECON 322 - Strategy & Information

How do individuals and groups make decisions? The core of the course is traditional game theory: the formal study of the choices and outcomes that emerge in multiperson strategic settings. Game theoretic concepts such as Nash equilibrium, rationalizability, backwards induction, sequential equilibrium, and common knowledge are motivated by and critiqued using applications drawn from education policy, macroeconomic policy, business strategy, terrorism risk mitigation, and good old-fashioned parlor games.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 103. MATH 205 recommended.

Instructor: Rothschild

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ECON 323
ECON 323 - Finance Theory & Investments

This course provides a rigorous treatment of the fundamentals of finance. Topics include the valuation of distant cash flows, pricing financial instruments such as stocks, bonds and options, portfolio choice, and equilibrium theories of asset pricing. Where possible, modern academic research that relates to these topics will be introduced and discussed.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203.

Instructor: Hilt

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ECON 324
ECON 324 - Behavioral Economics

Why do people give to charity? What can be done to convince more people to save money in retirement plans? This course explores these and other questions by introducing psychological phenomena into standard models of economics. Evidence from in-class experiments, real-world examples, and field and laboratory data is used to illustrate the ways in which actual behavior deviates from the classical assumptions of perfect rationality and narrow self-interest.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203.

Instructor: Shurchkov

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 326
ECON 326 - Adv. Econ of Education

This course applies modern econometric methods and evaluation design to the analysis of contemporary issues in education policy. Methods include randomized experiments, regression-discontinuity analysis, and the use of panel data. Issues include school accountability, private-school vouchers, and policies toward teacher labor markets. Students will conduct extensive empirical analysis of education data.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203.

Instructor: McEwan

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ECON 327
ECON 327 - Econ of Law, Policy, Inequality

This course uses an economic framework to explore the persistence of inequality in the U.S. The course will pay special attention to racial inequality. We will use economic theory to analyze the rules governing important societal institutions, like the criminal justice system, to understand their theoretical implications for inequality. After examining the theory, we will closely examine the empirical evidence that tests for discrimination in criminal procedures, school finance, residential choices, media coverage, labor market outcomes, and more.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203.

Instructor: Park

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 328
ECON 328 - Environment and Development

Poor sanitation, inadequate waste management, contaminated water supplies and exposure to indoor air pollution affect millions of people in developing countries and pose continuing risks to their health. The objective of this course is to provide students with a set of theoretical, econometric and practical skills to estimate the causal impact of environmental policies and programs with a particular focus on less-developed countries. Examples from the readings will explore the effect of laws, NGO programs or natural experiments on environmental quality and sustainability. Students will learn to critically analyze existing studies and to gauge how convincingly the research identifies a causal impact. Students will use these skills to develop an evaluation plan for a topic of their choice at the end of the term.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203.

Instructor: Keskin

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 332
ECON 332 - Advanced Health Economics

This course applies microeconomics to issues in health, medical care, and health insurance. Emphasis is placed on policy-relevant empirical research. Topics include the impact of health insurance on health, the interaction between health insurance and the labor market, the government's role in health care, the economics of medical provider reimbursement, and the effects of medical malpractice policy.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203.

Instructor: McKnight

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ECON 334
ECON 334 - Macroeconomics in Practice

How do practitioners—including policymakers, financial market participants, and economic forecasters—actually use the tools of macroeconomics? This course builds on Intermediate Macro and Econometrics to deepen your understanding of how the macroeconomy and macro policy really work. Key questions include: What challenges and puzzles are raised by recent macro developments? How are textbook macro models implemented empirically and how do they need to be extended to capture recent developments? How have/should monetary and fiscal policymakers respond given the (sometimes) inadequacy of models and other real-world complexities? Course assignments will include both a policy simulation and a macro forecasting exercise. Step beyond Econ 202 to develop a more sophisticated understanding of macroeconomics. 

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 202 and ECON 203.

Instructor: Sichel

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 335
ECON 335 - CSPW: Economic Journalism

Students will combine their knowledge of economics, including macro, micro, and econometrics, with their skills at exposition, in order to address current economic issues in a journalistic format. Students will conduct independent research to produce weekly articles. Assignments may include coverage of economic addresses, book reviews and recent journal articles. Students also will write an op-ed and a blog post. Class sessions will be organized as workshops devoted to critiquing the economic content of student work.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202, and ECON 203.

Instructor: Sichel

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Other Categories: CSPW - Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 341
ECON 341 - Industrial Organization

This course uses applied microeconomic theory to study the relationships between firm conduct, market structure, and industry performance. Topics include monopoly power and imperfect competition, price discrimination, product differentiation, firm entry/exit, advertising, and standard setting. The course will introduce the possibility that free markets may not produce the socially optimal set of products. Emphasis will be divided equally between the strategic implications of the models and the policy implications.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 350
ECON 350 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ECON 360
ECON 360 - Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ECON 370
ECON 370 - Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 360 and permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ECON 380H
ECON 380H - Economics Research Seminar

A seminar for senior economics majors engaged in independent research. Students will learn about the use of empirical techniques in economics, including the opportunity to engage with the research of prominent economists, who present their work at the Calderwood and Goldman seminars hosted by the department. Students will also present and discuss their own research at weekly meetings. Students may not accumulate more than 0.5 credit for this course.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor required. Limited to Senior Economics majors doing independent research.

Instructor: Hilt

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non Credit.