GER 101
GER 101 - Beginning German I

An introduction to contemporary German with emphasis on communicative fluency. Extensive practice in all four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Videos and Web-based activities introduce the student to topics from contemporary culture in German-speaking countries. Three periods.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Nolden

Typical Periods Offered: Fall; Winter

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: The department strongly urges all participants to sign up for both semesters in order to achieve the full introduction to the language that both semesters provide.

GER 102
GER 102 - Beginning German II

An introduction to contemporary German with emphasis on communicative fluency. Extensive practice in all four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Videos and Web-based activities introduce the student to topics from contemporary culture in German-speaking countries. Three periods.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: GER 101 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hans

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

GER 130
GER 130 - Fairy Tales&Childrens' Lit

This seminar focuses on fairy tales, their history, and their continued impact on contemporary culture. We begin by studying the tales themselves, trying to uncover their original meanings and purposes. Out of what historical moments and psychological needs did the tales arise? Why did the Brothers Grimm collect and compile them in the first place? We then consider the ways in which they have been rescripted and repurposed in everything from poetry to popular film, examining how cultural production appropriates these fairy tale structures, even while radically straying from them. We read these texts against the backdrop of a range of theoretical approaches to childhood and to literary and cultural criticism, in order to uncover their significance in the past and today.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Hans

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

GER 130Y
GER 130Y - FYS: Fairy Tales & Childrens Lit

This seminar focuses on fairy tales, their history, and their continued impact on contemporary culture. We begin by studying the tales themselves, trying to uncover their original meanings and purposes. Out of what historical moments and psychological needs did the tales arise? Why did the Brothers Grimm collect and compile them in the first place? We then consider the ways in which they have been rescripted and repurposed in everything from poetry to popular film, examining how cultural production appropriates these fairy tale structures, even while radically straying from them. We read these texts against the backdrop of a range of theoretical approaches to childhood and to literary and cultural criticism, in order to uncover their significance in the past and today.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Hans

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non Credit

GER 201
GER 201 - Intermediate German I

Strengthening and expanding of all language skills with special emphasis on idiomatic usage. Thorough grammar review, written, oral, and aural practice. Readings on contemporary cultural topics. Three periods.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: GER 102 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hans

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

GER 202
GER 202 - Intermediate German II

Strengthening and expanding of all language skills with special emphasis on idiomatic usage. Thorough grammar review, written, oral, and aural practice. Readings on contemporary cultural topics. Three periods.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: GER 201 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hans

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

GER 202W
GER 202W - Intermediate German in Berlin

Like GER 202 on campus, this course strengthens and expands all language skills including idiomatic grammar review, oral and listening practice, readings on contemporary and historical topics, and practice in composition. This course will be taught as an intensive Wintersession course in Berlin and will feature an important cultural component.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: GER 201 or permission of the instructor. Application required. Not open to students who have taken GER 202.

Instructor: Nolden

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Winter

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Winter

Notes: Not offered every year. Wintersession offerings are subject to Provost's Office approval.

GER 225
GER 225 - Berlin, Prague, Vienna

This course will introduce us to some of the focal points of Europe's cultural geography and trace the historical development of ideas and styles that shaped modernism. We will discuss the rise of Enlightenment thought and politics in 18th-century and the genesis of bourgeois idioms at the turn-of-the century, their critique in Sigmund Freud's Vienna and in Bert Brecht's and Dada's Berlins, as well as the crisis of subjectivity in Franz Kafka's Prague. Materials will be drawn from literature, music, paintings, and film.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. Not open to students who have taken GER 325.

Instructor: Hans

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course is also offered at the 300-level as GER 325.

GER 229
GER 229 - Germany in Global Context (Eng)

This course will trace the forces that shape the modern face of Germany and German culture. Through political and theoretical works, literature, and poetry, as well as visual art, music, and film, we will examine cross-cultural influence, colonialism, the effect of war and displacement, migration in and out of the nation, and the growth of an international entertainment industry. We will consider the reciprocal influence of German and French courtly culture in medieval poetry and epic, and its impact on poetic development; migration and displacement beginning with Goethe's Hermann and Dorothea (1797) up to the contemporary crisis re-shaping Europe; the colonial fantasies that shaped the construction of German identity; and the changing conceptualization of cultural and national identity from the Grimm's notion of language as formative to today's depictions of hybrid identities in contemporary film, literature, and popular culture.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Nolden

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Lectures, readings, and discussions are in English. This course is also offered at the 300-level as GER 329 with a third class meeting conducted in German.

GER 231
GER 231 - Fairy Tales & German Culture

This course will explore the fairy tale, with an emphasis on the works collected by the Brothers Grimm, and will trace its cultural legacy: the development of the genre, its predecessors and heirs, and its function both as literature and as component of a distinct political program. We will begin with an analysis of exemplary tales and variants, examining these in the framework of a range of critical approaches. We will then trace the evolution of the genre in terms of two very different tracks: in the Kunstmärchen and in contemporary children’s literature. In addition to giving students an understanding of the foundational function of these tales, this course will develop students’ communicative and analytical skills, focusing on complex written and oral argumentation and critical reading of progressively longer texts. Select grammar topics will be reviewed over the course of the semester. Prerequisites: GER 202 or permission of the instructor.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: GER 202 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hans

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

GER 234
GER 234 - Minorities in Germany/Austria

What does it mean to be “different” in Germany and Austria, and, by extension, what does it mean to “be” German or Austrian? In this class, we will consider the reciprocal relationship between those two positions and examine how religion, race, sexual identity, and citizenship is implicated in defining the individual’s position. Throughout history, minority groups have played key roles in shaping and (re)defining what “German” or “Austrian” actually means. By considering the centuries-long roles of the Jewish community and Black communities, the gay rights movement beginning in the late 19th century, and the history of the German-Turkish population and of immigration more broadly, we will examine the ways in which difference was defined at various points in history, trace the deep influence that those who might have been considered “outsiders” played in shaping German-speaking cultures, and look at the ways forward that are currently being sketched out by those working towards a broader and more inclusive society. We will focus on primary sources ranging from literature and journalistic texts to visual works to podcasts, interviews, and talks, and will practice how to understand and analyze these sources critically. The course will develop reading, comprehension, speaking, and writing skills.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: GER 202 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hans

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

GER 236
GER 236 - German Short Stories

This course focuses on short prose forms from the post-WWII period. Among the topics we will examine will be how writers grappled with the German historical heritage and the events of the Third Reich, WWII, and the Holocaust; how literature developed in the two Germanies and how certain texts might rescript historical events in service of foundational fictions of resistance; how the women’s, students’, and other movements of the 1960s impacted and found expression in literature; and how literature increasingly makes visible an oft-hidden diversity in German-speaking society and culture. The course is designed to introduce great works of recent German literature and methods of literary analysis, and to practice advanced language skills through targeted grammatical review, analytical writing, and discussion.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: GER 202 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hans

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall; Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

GER 238
GER 238 - Conversations About Germany Today

This conversation course will introduce students to important topics of recent German history, beginning with the fall of the wall to present-day concerns about climate change. We will be basing our conversations on graphic novels to learn how authors represent issues of societal concern by addressing primarily younger German audiences. Appreciating the interplay of image and word, we will identify prominent patterns of colloquial speech to inform our own conversational practice.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: GER 202 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Nolden

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

GER 239
GER 239 - Germany and Austria Today

Intensive practice in oral and written communication and presentation; introduction to rhetorical strategies of conversation and discussion; introduction to elements of German prose style; practice of various forms of writing. Review of selected grammar topics. On the basis of newspaper and magazine articles, essays and stories, television news, film clips, and website materials, we will discuss and write about current events and issues in Germany and Austria. Designed for students who have completed four or five semesters of language training or equivalent.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: GER 202 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Nolden

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Taught in German.

GER 250
GER 250 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

GER 250H
GER 250H - Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

GER 258
GER 258 - Imagining Germany

Focusing on the last two decades, this course will discuss how Germany has been featured in the imagination of writers, painters, and film makers both born in Germany and abroad.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: GER 202 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

GER 286
CAMS 286/ GER 286 - Film& Propag Nazi Germ(in Eng)

This course examines the cinematic output of Nazi Germany as a test case for the development of film as propaganda. We consider the cinematic medium as entertainment and as a cultural event with the potential to influence a population. We trace the forebears of Nazi film, including WWI propaganda produced in Britain, France and Germany and Soviet films made to serve the revolutionary agenda. We examine the ways in which Goebbels' Ministry of Propaganda deployed both overtly propagandist films and films that couched Nazi ideals in narratives from melodrama to fantasy, and examine whether films could exceed their official aims and become subversive. And we consider post-WWII developments: the continuing careers of producers of propaganda and the ways that modern media shapes new forms of propaganda.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 286

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Hans

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

GER 325
GER 325 - Berlin, Prague, Vienna

This course will introduce us to some of the focal points of Europe's cultural geography and trace the historical development of ideas and styles that shaped modernism. We will discuss the rise of Enlightenment thought and politics in 18th-century and the genesis of bourgeois idioms at the turn-of-the century, their critique in Sigmund Freud's Vienna and in Bert Brecht's and Dada's Berlins, as well as the crisis of subjectivity in Franz Kafka's Prague. Materials will be drawn from literature, music, paintings, and film. Class meetings taught in German with readings and discussions in German.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Two units taught in German above GER 202, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hans

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course is also offered at the 200-level as GER 225

GER 329
GER 329 - Germany in a Global Context

This course will trace the forces of identification, migration, and globalization that shape modern Germany. Examining political, theoretical, and artistic works, as well as visual art, music, and film, we consider cross-cultural influence, colonialism and colonial fantasies, the effect of war and displacement, migration in and out of the nation, and the growth of an international entertainment industry. We will trace the reciprocal influence of German and French courtly culture in medieval poetry and epic, and its impact on poetic development. We consider migration beginning with Goethe's Hermann and Dorothea (1797) up to the contemporary crisis re-shaping Europe. We investigate the colonial fantasies that shaped the construction of German identity and consider how the conceptualization of national identity has changed from the Grimm's notion of language as formative to today's radically hybrid concepts of nationality.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Two units taught in German above GER 202, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Nolden

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course is also offered at the 200-level as GER 229 and meets at the same time. Lectures, readings, and discussions are in English. GER 329 entails a third weekly class session, conducted in German, as well as additional readings and written assignments.

GER 338
GER 338 - Green German Literature

This course discusses the narrative challenges posed by the Anthropocene, the current era in history in which the impact of humans on the environment imperils the very future of our planet. Reading fictional and critical texts that have emerged in different parts of the world over the course of the last three decades, we will identify the fictional tools and aesthetic strategies that writers are exploring to address the climate catastrophe.  We will discuss what the traditions of writing about biocide are to which contemporary authors can turn when creating new narratives adequate to capture the environmental crisis. We will analyze the most prominent genres involved in “green writing” and will pay close attention to the ways authors deal with the tensions between the local and the global in their narratives.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Two units taught in German above GER 202, or permission of the instructor. Not open to students who have taken CPLT 238/ES 238.

Instructor: Nolden

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: This course meets with CPLT 238/ES 238 for two out of its three meetings.

GER 350
GER 350 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

GER 350H
GER 350H - Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

GER 360
GER 360 - Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

GER 362
GER 362 - CSPW: From Farm to Table to Print

When we talk about food, we think about personal passions, individual diets and eating behaviors, but we might also think about cultural traditions, consumption disparities and food insecurities, about public health and sustainability, animal rights, deforestation, and genome edited crops. Clearly, the topic challenges us to address difficult questions of intersectionality (of the personal and the political, the local and the global, the human and the non-human). In this seminar we will learn to translate academic discourses into public writing formats that might include op-eds, social media posts, (cook) book reviews, Wikipedia entries, restaurant reviews, and portraits of food activists.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed two units of German taught above GER 202 or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Nolden

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Other Categories: CSPW - Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: This course meets with CPLT 362/ES 362. The lectures will be in English. Students taking the course as GER 362 will be doing additional writing, translations and peer-editing in German.

GER 370
GER 370 - Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: GER 360 and permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

GER 385
GER 385 - Sem: Cultural Prod. in Berlin Republic

Beginning with the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 all the way through 2020, this seminar presents a survey of more recent trends in German writing and filmmaking. We will identify essential moments of this generational turn when artists opted to revise many of the established aesthetic choices of their predecessors. They turned to themes and approaches that used to be avoided previously now emerged in powerful cultural productions to challenge societal norms and decorum with at times, radical aesthetic interventions.

In the seminar, we will examine how the following topics informed the cultural productions of writers and filmmakers: revisionary images of colonial history; retakes on German unification; questioning of social concords; enunciations of sexual identities; articulations of minority voices; experimentation with radical stylistics.

An additional component on contemporary film will allow us to discern similarities between approaches taken in literature and those on the screen.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Two units taught in German above 202, and permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Nolden

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

GER 386
GER 386 - Sem: Women in 20th c. Germany

This seminar focuses on women’s lives and the ways women depicted them in early 20th century Germany. Germany in this era presents a fascinating example of the ways in which changing institutions and norms shaped women’s roles and lives. In cultural production from the time, we see the hopes and fears raised by emancipation: the specter of female desire in Wedekind’s Lulu plays, the women grappling with gender roles in Sagan’s Mädchen in Uniform (1931). How did these women challenge cultural conventions and help redefine a canon? We will consider, as well, the lives of women creators: from Käthe Kollwitz, whose art movingly engaged with women’s loss, to Leni Riefenstahl, whose rapid rise as director was tied to the notoriety of her work for the Nazis.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Two units taught in German above 202 (or equivalent) and permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hans

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every four years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

GER 387
GER 387 - Seminar: New Media

In this seminar we will be asking the following questions: Which media have shaped the development of culture in German-speaking countries? How do new media disrupt established forms of public discourse? What are the responses to the introduction of new media? Our course will be spanning large segments of cultural and media history, beginning with impact of the printing press during the Renaissance through the introduction of paperback novels, photography, sound film, the graphic novel, and finally the internet novel.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Two units taught in German above 202 (or equivalent) and permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Nolden

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

GER 388
GER 388 - Germany, Europe, and the US

This course will address major moments in the history of Germany's complex relationship towards (the idea of) Europe and the United States and how this triangular constellation has been reflected in cultural productions, including essays, novels, films, paintings, and music. Always considered a major player both on the European and the global stage, Germany's position has been oscillating between a desire to dominate and a reluctance to lead. This course will identify the cultural debates that have informed the German attitude towards its neighbors since its Romantic inception as a nation.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Two units taught in German above 202 (or equivalent) and permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Nolden

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

GER 389
GER 389 - Sem: Culture & Identity in Germany

This course examines how culture has constructed and engaged with the power structures that shape the human experience in Germany over the past centuries. How is identity defined by and subjectivity essentially created by culture and society? How are the categories by which we identify ourselves — gender, ethnicity, class — put into place through cultural discourse? We will consider the changing relationships between the individual and such systems as family, medicine, religion, and state, and trace how these relationships are both interrogated and affirmed in literature, film, art, and theoretical writings. We will analyze the family and the codification of gender roles in texts like Lessing's "Emilia Galotti;" the influence of social norms and codes in Büchner's "Woyzeck;" the power of the state and its incursion on the personal in Christa Wolf's "What remains." We will trace the subject from older, often canonical texts into contemporary culture. Lectures, readings, and discussions in German.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Two units taught in German above 202 (or equivalent) and permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hans

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: